Category: professional writing services

On the horns of a dilemma: origin of idioms

Black/brown ram
On the horns of a dilemma

Life right now might be bland. Not much to do. And no people to see. Life during lockdown is colourless and lacks flavour. You might say it’s vanilla.

‘Vanilla” is Merriam Webster’s word of the day. Why does ‘vanilla’ get the blame for dull, lack-lustre boring and bleak, I have to add?

Hanged for a sheep as a lamb: idioms

My crimes are small. Stealing pens from the office, wishing ill will against my husband, and using a credit card which refuses to close no matter how many times I phone to request this. I must say I am enjoying this free money and the guilt has all but evaporated.

Oh, for the life of Rilely: origin of idioms

I guess it’s no co-incidence that my blog today is about living the life of Riley. As I have been feeling restless and vigorously browsing travel sites (Corona virus notwithstanding – SA has just confirmed its first case) it should come as no surprise as the universe has a way of putting universal synergy in your path.

Best is best! Language quirks

I am constantly amazed at the number of authors who label their books ‘No 1. Bestseller’. Last weekend, I shared a platform with a new writer who did just that. A Google search reveals 2.2 billion responses for the term ‘No.1 bestseller’, but by the strict definition of the term there should be only one.

Valentine’s chip on shoulder: how idioms originate

Bad day...
Grumpy?

As it’s Valentine’s Day, I was remembering one of the less romantic dates of my early dating life.

I think it was the second date and Charles had asked to “see my etchings”.

The unromantic prelude to this great event was the sharing of a plate of chips. Two remained on the plate, and I said to Charles, “You can have them, one for each shoulder,” smiling at my own wit.

Limelight or spotlight? Use the right phrase.

Novak Djokovic enjoys the limelight

The English language is full of tricks and words of similar meaning that are confusing to second language speakers.

One of these is limelight and spotlight. While some believe that to be in the limelight and under the spotlight are much the same, I think they are quite different.

From six yards to nine: how idioms originate

In mid-January I asked my bookkeeper for an updated statement of my account. I wanted to look at my Dec/Jan financial affairs to prepare myself for 2020.

What he sent was a massive 13-page dossier going back to January 2019.

Magnate or magnet: Use the right word

Colour magnets
Fridge magnets – the scientific kind

This week South Africans bade farewell to our stalwart entrepreneur Richard Maponya. Mayponya, who died at the age of 99, brought to the country, the first shopping mall in a township. Until that day, the two were a contradiction in terms.

The newsreader said that we had lost a business magnate

Best thing since sliced bread: how idioms are formed

Last week, I decided I was tired of egg and toast for breakfast, so I ate muesli for five days. This week I ran out of bread and it would be a while until I could get to the shops. By the end of the week I was really missing my bread.

Black Friday and bargain idioms

Madness

When Game of Thrones captured the imagination of millions of fans to an obsessive degree, I used to say, “You get two kinds of people – those who watch Game of Thrones and those who do not.” I was in the ‘do not’ camp.

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