Year: 2021

Hard to call someone a horse’s ass: idiom usage

Photo: Iza Grek

Having said good-bye to the last of the Easter holiday makers in Durban, a coastal town in South Africa, we started to make our way home on Monday. On the way back we stopped at Van Reenen just off the N3 that runs between Johannesburg and the province, KwaZulu Natal.

See the scissors of the sub-editor

Pay down cash

Where cash was once king, no-one wants to transact with hard currency, banks charge a fortune for handling the dirty lucre and it’s certainly not safe to be walking around with a stash in your back pocket.

Have no fear – CONTENT is the new king. Content is the king of the ‘interverse’. Everybody wants it, everybody has it and everybody dumps it anywhere and anyhow.

Debug your grammar gremlin

Grammar
Time will get you there

In my job, as sub-editor at a community newspaper, I had to reprimand a reporter for shoddy work.

His report was submitted for subbing with several repeated paragraphs. When I pointed this out to him, he swore it was a systems error.

This was highly unlikely and even if it was, he should have made the necessary corrections to the piece before sending it on for subbing.

Trends for 2021 and beyond

Africa rising
Kids in Africa enjoying their freedom

With the year, two and a bit months underway, there’s been enough time to reflect on trends that will shape the decade ahead. I’ve put my thoughts together and come up with these six.

  • Moocs

A search for Moocs returns almost 35 billion responses in under seven seconds on Google. That many. There are possibly as many Moocs as there are searches for them. We are talking about Massive Open Online Course. There are no barriers to entry (free) for these courses and there are thousands.

A stonking good word

A stonking good wordEvery now and then, a word comes a long that makes me prick up my ears and say, ‘that’s a good one’.

Stonking is such a word.

There’s so much to say about stonking. For starters dictionaries across the web from Cambridge to Oxford and Encarta broadly agree on its adjectival usage to mean “large, impressive, used to emphasise how good or enjoyable something is.”

Groundhog Day: origin of idioms

Groundhog idiom
Groundhog tests the weather

From Ricky Gervais’ production of “Afterlife” (Netflix) to a number of recent articles in the press, the term groundhog day, seems to be popping up everywhere. Not sure what it meant, I set out to investigate.