Category: write better English

Waiting for the cows to come home: idiom usage

Photo by Stijn te Strake on Unsplash

 

It seems that I have to wait for the cows to come home to get paid by some of my clients. In one instance, I have been waiting for more than four months for an invoice to be paid.

Each time I phone to enquire about the status of the payment I am fobbed off with lies that equate to “the cheque is in the mail”.

Black Friday and bargain idioms

Madness

When Game of Thrones captured the imagination of millions of fans to an obsessive degree, I used to say, “You get two kinds of people – those who watch Game of Thrones and those who do not.” I was in the ‘do not’ camp.

You’re never too young to write a book

There’s a book in everyone, so the saying goes. And in some there are more than one – think of all the Jodi Picoult and Nora Roberts, John Grisham and Cathy Kelly novels out there, for example.

Whether you have one or many, the point here is that you’re never too young to write a book. This has been proved by a talented writer under the age of 10.

Wise up to words on your web in 2020

It’s often said that owning a website is like having your own piece of online real estate. Who wouldn’t want that? A no-brainer. But statistics show that many small business owners are not there yet or have little or no intention of getting there. And that’s not wise. If you’re in business at all you need a website.

Take the log out of your eye and other idioms

Last night while watching Come Dine With Me, I latched on to satirist David Lamb’s shortening of an idiom. He simply used the two words of comparison and said, pot/ kettle Terence, to suggest he had a blind spot.

Three sheets to the wind: How idioms originate

Last week I had mentioned to my sister that I saw my aunt at a function and she was three sheets to the wind. This meant I could not give her the important message. My sister looked at me in despair and said she did not know what that meant.

Let them eat cake: How idioms originate

pic by Eric Tompkins _ Unsplash

At a United Nations gender equality conference last week, one of the speakers who was trying to break through the gender disparity in our society used the phrase “bread and circuses” quite a lot.  I’m not sure if her usage was correct, but there it was.

Idioms in the workplace

jeff-sheldon-sVGH5ROWnl4-unsplashWith the latest unemployment figures in South Africa at 29%, here’s a quick run down of some of the work-related idioms and how to use them.

 

Learn the Ropes

Meaning: Become more familiar with a job or field; be trained

Example:  John takes about three months to learn the ropes and then finds that he is bored.

Get the Sack/ Be Sacked

Flying too close to the sun: how idioms originate

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This week while sipping on a warm Coke Zero at lunch with a friend, we began to discuss the wonders of Greece. She reminded me of the fable of Icarus.

Icarus had wings fashioned out of feathers and wax to assist his escape from the prison where he and his father were captive.

Robo dog delivers in driverless car: AI is in our world


While updating myself with news of the day I happened across the headline
“This robot delivery dog will hitch a ride in a driverless car to deliver your packages.” https://www.verdict.co.uk/robot-delivery-dog-continental/

Two things struck me:

  1. The reality of AI and the number of jobs that are lost to mechanisation and 2. my mind travelled back to the article I read this morning about the 10 000 jobs lost in newsrooms over the past 10 yearsFor us as writers it only means one thing – we have to be more and more creative and put our minds to writing content – that not just sells but sizzles and stirs mouth-watering responses.
    Hire me. I’m your gal …(sorry it’s about dogs again)

Can writers be replaced by Artificial Intelligence?

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